10 key best practices for learning interaction design

The interaction design in your learning will make or break your learner’s user experience. Content is key, but the way that the learner is made to interact with that content in order to assimilate it and put themselves in the position of “learning by doing” is even more important.Interaction Design Interaction Design Interaction Design Interaction Design Interaction Design

However, you can’t just chuck any flashy interaction at the content and hope it sticks. There’s a careful craft to ensuring each interaction is the perfect fit for the content it deals with, and different learning points will potentially require different approaches. The narrative will relate the learner to the situation, but it’s the interaction that embeds the learning into becoming a natural behavioural pattern – if done well.Interaction Design Interaction Design Interaction Design Interaction Design Interaction Design

Sprinkling into the mix some surprise and delight keeps up engagement and motivation as well as making the learning memorable.

As a learning designer, I live by the following code.

1) Keep it simple

Try to make interaction design so simple and intuitive that even someone who missed reading the instructional text can still navigate the content effectively. This can be as simple as suggesting a call to action (CTA) button is active based on its colour. It’s these little touches that imperceptibly add smoothness to the experience.Interaction Design Interaction Design Interaction Design Interaction Design Interaction Design

Think wider than the standard, boring Next or Back buttons. Instead, make the experience much more fluid using specific, context-sensitive CTA buttons that don’t break the flow of the content, such as “Let’s meet John”.

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